AAOD JOURNAL
I
SSUE
9

THE ANNUAL PUBLICATION OF AUSTRALIAN AGE OF DINOSAURS
MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY



Order a copy
or
Subscribe to the Journal and Become a Member

Journal   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10


FEATURES

22  TRACKS BELOW THE TIDE
     
The dinosaur tracks of Broome
      Story by Maria Zammit and David Elliott

48  LOVELLEA
      Flower of the forest
      Story by Joanne Wilkinson

46  YABBIES OF YORE
      The Cretaceous crayfish of Victoria
      Story by Prof Tony Martin

56  HAILSTONES OF GLASS
      Tracing the origin of Australasian tektites
      Story by Dr Peter W Haines

70  LOST SERENGETI OF THE SEA
      The marine megafauna of Beaumaris
      Story by Erich Fitzgerald

REGULARS 
2    EDITORIAL

4    DIGGERS DIARY NEWS AND VIEWS

6    BLACKSOIL
      Saving the Stories
      Finding a Date at Winton
      Another group of dinosaurs recognised in Victoria
      Creeping with Dinosaurs

12  DIARY OF AN AUSTRALIAN DREAM

84  PALAEO PROFILE

88  TAILBONES


OUR COVER

A large sauropod dinosaur leaves its footprints across the mud flats of an intertidal zone on the edge of the ancient continent Gondwana. Tracks made by these Early Cretaceous giants 130 million years ago are preserved in what is now the Broome Sandstone of the Dampier Peninsula in Western Australia.

Illustration by Laurie Beirne

Typesetting and Design by Action Graphics

17 McCosker Drive, Dalveen, Qld 4374

E: info@action-graphics.com.au

T: (07) 4685 2266

 

Printed by APN Print,

Kenilworth Street, Warwick, Qld 4370

 

MANAGEMENT AND STAFF


Australian Age of Dinosaurs Limited:

Chairman  – David Elliott
Secretary - Judy Elliott
Directors – Bruce Collins, Scott Hocknull, Carol Trewick
, Bill Wavish, Ailsa Leacy, Ed Warren

Society Coordinator - Linda Young


Honorary Appointments

Curator – Dr Alex Cook

Collections Manager - David Elliott


Staff

Chief of Operations – ???

Laboratory Manager – Trish Sloan

Manager Retail/ Admin. – Linda Young

Technicians – George Sinapius, Steven Rumbold

Palaeontology – Travis Tischler, Matt White, Stephen Poropat


Australian Age of Dinosaurs Journal

Editor – David Elliott

Graphic Design – David and Judy Elliott

Staff Writer – Robyn Molan

Typesetting/Graphic Design – Aaron Tomkins

Proofreading – Jenel Hunt, Bev Ursem


Patron

Her Excellency Ms Quentin Bryce AC, Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Front Cover
: Laurie Beirne
Blacksoil
: Susannah Thomsett, Jenni McPhee, Dr Alex Cook, Dr Scott Bryan, James Greentree, Maree Corkeron, Dr Tom Rich, Prof Pat Vickers Rich, Jenni Brammall
Diary of an Australian Dream
: David Elliott, Judy Elliott, Carol Trewick, Grant Hansen, Trish Sloan, Leith Wavish, Doug Miller, Dr Brant Bassam, Travis Tischler
Features
: Maria Zammit, Joanne Wilkinson, Professor Anthony J Martin, Dr Peter Haines, Dr Erich Fitzgerald, (see articles for further acknowledgements)
Palaeo-Profile
: Robyn Molan
Science Behind the Scenes:
Dr Steve Poropat
Tail Bones
: Professor Anthony J Martin


TOP

EDITORIAL

An unexpected letter arrived in the mail in June this year. Posted from Broome, WA, the letter detailed the concern held by a group of local residents for the future of dinosaur tracks along the shoreline north of their town. A portion of the area containing some of the best tracks had been flagged for industrial development and the letter pleaded for support in obtaining Natural Heritage listing for the trackways.

While it is not the role of Australian Age of Dinosaurs to become embroiled in controversy, the letter did tug at our heartstrings. The protection of Australian natural heritage is, in effect, the core business of AAOD and although we were not closely associated with the Broome dinosaur tracks, we were well aware of their significance. It was impossible to ignore and a letter to the Australian Heritage Council requesting that protection of this natural phenomenon be considered was soon on its way.

Although a story on the dinosaurs of Broome wasn’t planned for this year’s journal, the whole situation made me think. Located on the northern coastline of Western Australia, Broome is a long way from anywhere and, in spite of the significance of the dinosaur tracks, very few Australians know much about them. If they were on the east coast they would doubtless be a national icon – a major tourist attraction with palaeontologists crawling all over them. But Broome! Way out in the middle of nowhere?

It took no time to boil the whole thing down to two simple questions: Does isolation lessen significance? Does ignorance equal irrelevance? The answer to both was obvious. We concluded that although there might not be much we could do about the isolation of Broome’s dinosaurs, there was certainly something we could do about our ignorance of them. With that decision behind us, we set about planning how we might get this story together in time to beat the publishing deadline of Australian Age of Dinosaurs.

As soon as we delved into the history of the Broome tracks, I realised how little I knew about so much. Although I was aware that they had formed part of the Aboriginal people’s Dreamtime Stories for (possibly) many thousands of years, I was amazed to learn just how much scientific work had been done on them. I had no idea that there were so many tracks of so many different kinds of dinosaurs – or that each track was woven into the context of so many different palaeo environments. It quickly became evident that what I believed was an artefact of national importance was in fact an icon of international significance. And yet the average person knows very little about it …

For me, covering the Broome story has been an eye opener, and it joins a fascinating range of topics in this year’s journal – from the humble 105-million- year-old yabby fossils of Victoria to a cataclysmic event in south-east Asia that caused a glass hailstorm to rain on our continent 800,000 years ago. The articles are engaging, informative and interesting – in many cases representing the scientific research of very dedicated people including palaeontologists, students, geologists, botanists and everything in between. Some are famous for their work, others virtually unknown – it simply doesn’t matter. What does matter is that their research is understood and appreciated by every- day people because without this acceptance much of it could well be futile. It is imperative that we, as a nation, acknowledge their science and its relevance to our natural history because only then will we be able to truly devote our energies to preserving it. We may not always be able to change things for the better, but there is no excuse for not trying!

David Elliott


© Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd.       Terms of Use       Privacy Statement      Disclaimer       Payments       Contact Us      TOP
Make a Free Website with Yola.